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Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

1 edition of High-Temperature Ordered Intermetallic Alloys IV found in the catalog.

High-Temperature Ordered Intermetallic Alloys IV

L. A. Johnson

High-Temperature Ordered Intermetallic Alloys IV

Symposium Held November 27-30, 1990, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A. (Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings)

by L. A. Johnson

  • 73 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by Materials Research Society .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Material Science,
  • Alloys,
  • Technology & Industrial Arts,
  • Congresses,
  • Heat resistant alloys,
  • Intermetalic compounds,
  • Order-disorder in alloys,
  • Science/Mathematics

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsJ. O. Stiegler (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages1082
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL12091868M
    ISBN 101558991050
    ISBN 109781558991057

    Metal alloys with atomic scale ordering (ordered intermetallics) have emerged as a new class of high performance materials for mediating electrochemical reactions. However, ordered intermetallic nanostructures often require long synthesis times and/or high temperature annealing to form because a high-activation energy barrier for interdiffusion must be overcome for the constituent metals to Cited by: 4.   The yield strength remains nominally constant as a function of temperature but then falls sharply at a critical temperature depending on stoichiometry. Experiments by Srinivasan et al.(R. Srinivasan et al., phMat. Res. Soc.: High Temperature Ordered Intermetallic Alloys IV), (), and Kim and Gibala(J.T. Kim and R. Gibala, phMat. Res Author: Jason S. Brown, Murray S. Daw.

    High-Temperature Alloy Properties In the material selection process, many factors need to be considered including the temperature and environment. High temperature properties, although very useful in design, can also be key to selecting the most cost effective alloy. In order to bypass problems associated with the transient oxidation stage of alloys and intermetallic compounds, high-dose implants of oxygen are used to form a continuous oxygen saturated layer at room temperature. In order to study the implanted layer using secondary ion mass spectrometry 18 0 is used as the implanted species.

    Ordered alloys having a superlattice crystal structure. Unlike conventional alloys, they have a strong chemical arrangement that reduces the mobility of atoms and results in good structural stability, higher melting temperatures, and lower densities.   However, intermetallic alloys also possess many remarkable properties. Their high temperature strength is often very attractive (some alloys even get stronger as they get hotter over certain temperature ranges), and they frequently exhibit very good resistance to high temperature corrosion, due to the formation of A1 2 0 3 or Si0 2 rich oxide.


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High-Temperature Ordered Intermetallic Alloys IV by L. A. Johnson Download PDF EPUB FB2

High-Temperature Ordered Intermetallic Alloys: Symposium Held November, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A (Materials Research Society Symposi) Hardcover – June 1, by C. Koch (Author), C. Liu (Author) See all formats and editions Hide Author: C.

Koch, C. Liu, Norman S. Stoloff. High-Temperature Ordered Intermetallic Alloys V: Symposium Held November December 3,Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A. (Materials Research Society Author: Ram Darolia, Ian Baker, J. Daniel Whittenberger. Ordered intermetallics constitute a unique class of metallic materials which may be developed as new-generation materials for structural use at high temperatures in hostile environments.

At present, there is a worldwide interest in intermetallics, and extensive efforts have been devoted to intermetallic research and development in the U.S.

High-temperature ordered intermetallic alloys IV: symposium held November, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A. With contributions from 72 authors from 14 different countries, this book introduces a broad range of new topics including: new intermetallic families, new means of assessment of bonding and stability, new properties and phenomena, new applications, new practical processes and new research techniques.

Extensive research during the last eight years has resulted in the development and improvement of second-generation gamma alloys of engineering importance, TiAl-2(Cr or Mn)-2Nb and derivatives.

These alloys exhibit properties, in duplex micro-structural forms, meeting requirements for some gas-turbine and automobile engine components that may be used up to °C.

These Cited by:   This article summarizes recent progress in research and development on nickel and iron aluminide intermetallic alloys. Ordered intermetallics possess attractive properties for structural applications at elevated temperatures in hostile environments; however, brittle failure and poor fracture resistance limit their use as engineering by: The paper summarizes our present understanding, as established at a recent workshop, of two classes of intermetallic alloys: nickel and iron aluminides, which are currently used by industries; and advanced intermetallic alloys including silicides and Laves-phase alloys, which have a great potential to be developed as new high-temperature structural materials for future industrial by: High-temperature Ordered Intermetallic Alloys Ii的话题 (全部 条) 什么是话题 无论是一部作品、一个人,还是一件事,都往往可以衍生出许多不同的话题。.

Zener peak from high temperature side in Fe-Al-Cr alloys was observed by TDIF [81] and FDIF [86] tests (see §II.4). b) Frequency dependent internal friction (FDIF).

High-temperature ordered intermetallic alloys VIII [electronic resource]. Imprint Warrendale, Pa.: Materials Research Society, c Physical description The Role of Computational Modeling Processes in the Development and Understanding of NiAl-Based Ordered Intermetallic Alloys.

Mechanical behaviour of ion–irradiated ordered intermetallic compounds. Three–phase [&bgr; + &bgr;' + y'] Ni–AI–Ti–[Cr,Fe] alloys for high temperature use. High Temperature Deformation and Mechanical Properties. New concepts of analyzing plastic deformation of TiAI and Ni3AI intermetallic Edition: 1.

In most cases, their hot corrosion resistance and simultaneously hardness are important. One of the main applications of intermetallic compounds is for superalloy turbine blades in which they show appropriate high-temperature-related properties. This book col Intermetallic compounds are usually brittle with high melting Author: Mahmood Aliofkhazraei.

The deformation and processing of structural materials is divided into eight chapters, each one exploring a material’s processing and deformation behaviour. They also consider how the microstructural composition of materials is affected by processing and what influence this has on its subsequent in.

Fu, C.L. and Yoo, M.H., in High-Temperature Ordered Intermetallic Alloys IV, edited by Johnson, L., Stiegler, J.O., and Pope, D.P. (Mater. Oxidation of Polycrystalline Alloys versus Single Crystals Oxidation of Intermetallic TiAl References Chapter 5.

High temperature corrosion Hot Corrosion Process Hot Corrosion of Metals and Alloys Role of Specific Alloying Elements in Hot Corrosion of Ni and Co Based Alloys and Influence of Other Contaminants.

Shuji Hanada is the author of High-Temperature Ordered Intermetallic Alloys VI Book 2 Part Set ( avg rating, 0 ratings, 0 reviews, published ) and. An intermetallic (also called an intermetallic compound, intermetallic alloy, ordered intermetallic alloy, and a long-range-ordered alloy) is a type of metallic alloy that forms a solid-state compound exhibiting defined stoichiometry and ordered crystal structure.

Although the term "intermetallic compounds", as it applies to solid phases, has been in use for many years, its introduction was. Chapter 8 RECRYSTALLIZATION OF ORDERED MATERIALS INTRODUCTION There is significant interest in the use of ordered intermetallic compounds as high temperature structural materials.

However, use of these materials is frequently limited intermetallics. However, some ordered alloys, such as boron-doped Ni 3Al, can be extensively deformed at.

The attractive physical and mechanical properties of ordered intermetallic alloys have been recognized since early in this century. However, periodic attempts to develop intermetallics for structural applications were unsuc­ cessful, due in major part to the twin handicaps of inadequate low-temper­ ature ductility or toughness, together with poor elevated-temperature creep strength.

Chapter 9 Creep of Intermetallics INTRODUCTION The term ‘‘intermetallics’’ has been used to designate the intermetallic phases and compounds which result from the combination of various metals, and which form a large class of materials [].

There are mainly three types of superlattice structures based on the f.c.c. lattice, i.e. L1.Let’s address a common challenge faced when machining high-temperature alloys (INCONEL®, titanium, and other heat-resistant alloys).

The Component: Components machined from INCONEL® bar stock Your Challenge: Controlling the expenses involved with machining high-temperature alloys. These materials are already expensive compared to more traditional materials like steel and cast iron, and. The microstructures and mechanical properties of single phase and multiphase alloys are reported for Al-rich intermetallic alloys containing up to 45 at.

% Ti and as much as 68 at. % Cr. Among the individual phases formed in these alloys, TiAl and tau (Al 67 Cr 8 Ti 25) had both the lowest hardnesses and the greatest resistance to cracking Cited by: